WCHF People in the News

A recent article in the Shepherd Express featured several people associated with Wisconsin Conservation Hall of Fame (WCHF).  Entitled “Lessons from the Historic Banning of DDT,” Virginia Small covered everything from the historical to the current lessons learned through the process of banning DDT and mentions:

Lorrie Otto standing before her native landscaped yard. Photo by Ney Tait Fraser

Lorrie Otto – inducted into Hall of Fame 1999.

Joseph Hickey — inducted into Hall of Fame

Gaylord Nelson — inducted into Hall of Fame

Frederick L Ott — nominated to the Hall of Fame

Bill Berry — member of WCHF Board of Governors

She closed the article with several quotes from Whitney Gould, who covered the DDT hearings for the Capital Times.  “Environmental protection works….” “…Triumph of Science.” “…Citizen activism pays off.”

With “…the rise of the #MeToo Movement, blogging and social media has made it easier to mobilize concerned citizens around fraught issues. When people despair about the state of the environment, they can think back to what happened with DDT.” (Shepherd Express)

 

Mending the Earth

A new book featuring Lorrie Otto quite prominently has hit the shelves. Mending the Earth in Milwaukee, written and published by Ney Tait Fraser, is a how-to guide about natural landscaping in southeastern Wisconsin, but is written in such lyrical fashion it’s like reading about an urban adventure. The stories are about Lorrie Otto and 15 friends and acquaintances, some of who took the plunge as early as the 1970s and 1980s, who began converting their yards to natural landscaping using native plants. Their stories are about a love affair with native flora that continues through to today, and the many photos included in the book only add to the adventure.

Lorrie Otto who led the battle to ban DDT in Wisconsin in the 1960s, went on to promote the use of native plants and natural landscaping as a way to heal the Earth one yard at a time. The not-for-profit national organization Wild Ones: Native Plants, Natural Landscapes is a reflection of her passion and her efforts.

Lorrie was inducted into the WCHF in 1999.

For more information about Ney Tait Fraser’s book, see Journal Sentinel.

 

WCHF Receives Notice of Besadny Grant

WCHF was recently notified by the Natural Resources Foundation (NWF) that they will be receiving a C.D. Besadny Conservation grant for $1,000 to be used to develop a Touchscreen Computer Exhibit for Wisconsin Conservation Hall of Fame Gallery. The actual award will be delivered in person to the WCHF Board on November 3, 2018. Congratulations to WCHF.

Thank you to the Natural Resources Foundation.

List of other grant recipients.

2019 Wisconsin AWRA Annual Meeting Scheduled – Call for Papers

The annual meeting of the Wisconsin Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) will be held at the Lake Lawn Resort in Delavan, WI on February 28 and March 1, 2019. Please note the earlier meeting dates!

The theme this year is Clearing the Waters: Effective Science and Communication. There will be plenary, oral and poster sessions, plus lightning talks, addressing both surface water and groundwater issues in Wisconsin. Read more

Lorrie Otto in the News

The Godmother of the modern day Natural Landscaping Movement, Lorrie Otto was inducted into the WCHF in 1991. Photo by Ney Tait Frasier.

Bill Berry is a WCHF Governor and he is also a columnist for the Madison Capital Times. He recently wrote a column featuring Lorrie Otto entitled “Will we survive the current batch of ‘environmental terrorist’?” He talks about the heroes of the environmental movement started in the 1960s like Lorrie Otto and the Citizens Natural Resources Association (CNRA), and about the terrorists who are today dismantling Nixon’s EPA.

It’s a good read. I especially liked the final para which reads “Will we survive the current batch of “environmental terrorists”? Maybe. Personally, I wish Lorrie Otto was still alive so I could watch her tear Pruitt apart.” I would, too!